VORM AND MADASTER JOIN FORCES TO COMBAT CONSTRUCTION WASTE

Papendrecht – 12 March 2019 – VORM and Madaster will be joining forces to eliminate waste in the built environment. Buildings are being registered in Madaster’s online material library from which material passports can be generated. Data registration, ordering, storage and access through the Madaster Platform provides materials with an identity and prevents them from ending up as waste. The first building that VORM has registered in Madaster is VORM Materieel in Papendrecht. Another material passport will be generated for the historical property De Nieuwe Maaskant, which will become the new premises of VORM Holding in late 2019.

Around 30% of all of today’s waste material is related to the construction sector. It is vitally important that private citizens, entrepreneurs, government authorities and semi-public organisations take responsibility for reducing this percentage, as rapidly as possible. As project developer and construction company, VORM is taking its responsibility by registering buildings in Madaster. This not only means that the materials incorporated in these buildings can be located and identified at any time, but also reveals which materials would become available during renovations. This can make a substantial difference in the amount of construction waste and environmental pollution.

Sustainability and circularity go hand in hand
‘If Madaster indicates that, in 55 years, a certain building will still hold 10% of its original value, you can take this salvage value into account instead of completely writing off the building.’ says Erwin Boon, Innovation Manager at VORM. ‘During a building’s design phase, Madaster can provide insight into the degree of circularity of the new real estate object. This provides full insight into the circular and financial value of that building. Here, sustainability and circularity go hand in hand. Waste will be eliminated and materials are given a new lease of life.’

The material passport
Madaster’s material passports contain information about the quality and origins of materials, the degree to which they can be dismantled or disassembled, and where those materials are located within the building. In addition, it reveals both the historical, current and future value. Thus, circular and financial information flows are linked.

‘The comprehensive information in a material passport helps building owners, designers and builders to make new considerations during a building’s design, construction and management. Furthermore, financiers can include the value of the materials in their appraisal of a property. Each building is in fact a valuable repository.’ Pablo van den Bosch, Board Member of the Madaster Foundation